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Edu’s Transfer Targets: January 2023

Will we sign the midfielder we need in January?


  • Total voters
    83
  • This poll will close: .

The_Playmaker

Established Member
Trusted ⭐
What's wrong with Danilo? Looks pretty good to me.

He's not as good on the ball as Partey. I think we take it for granted to be honest. Partey is so good on the ball. I don't think Danilo can turn and evade pressure aswell as him. Traore defo can. Its just a thought. Partey isn't a typical DM. There are reasons why footballers become DMs. Not quite a CB, not quite a CM. Finding a DM with the passing, dribbling and disguise that Partey has is impossible. Its also the game intelligence. He is a very smart footballer. His positioning is immaculate.

Replacing him will require thinking outside the box. Apparently Traore has game intelligence off the charts.
 

Rex Bezos

A-M Draft Dodger 🪖
Trusted ⭐
Martinelli was called the a "talent of the century" by the manager of the team you've just mentioned (back when Liverpool were actually a top side)

What do I care about what managers say? All about the games big man.
 

ArsenalInMyHeart

Well-Known Member
He's not as good on the ball as Partey. I think we take it for granted to be honest. Partey is so good on the ball. I don't think Danilo can turn and evade pressure aswell as him. Traore defo can. Its just a thought. Partey isn't a typical DM. There are reasons why footballers become DMs. Not quite a CB, not quite a CM. Finding a DM with the passing, dribbling and disguise that Partey has is impossible. Its also the game intelligence. He is a very smart footballer. His positioning is immaculate.

Replacing him will require thinking outside the box. Apparently Traore has game intelligence off the charts.
who is Traore?
 

bakaboo

Member
So I have been looking at Partey successors and man is it hard. He is such a unique player. So strong and press resistant, but also has excellent passing and ball winning ability. That simply doesn't exist in many players in the world. Especially younger players.

Players like Kephrem Thuram and Fofana at Monaco all look good statistically, but they lack in passing and just that aura.

It may be about scouting really well and finding someone under the radar. Someone who is really intriguing to me is Hamad Traore at Sassuolo.

Sassuolo play him further forward or wide, but prior to that he played at Empoli as an 8 and matches Bennacer for dribbles and tackles. 6 ft tall and excellent on the ball, I have a feeling he can move further back.


Woo, looks excellent based on the youtube clip. He can do a job at DM but I feels he is the all action type of player which can fufill 2-3 position. Maybe U can send his info to the Arsenal scouting team.
 

MikelHadADream

Established Member
Trusted ⭐
Lads on about Leao are spot on. We are at the stage where we need level raisers like Jesus/Saliba, not new project players like Mudryk. Imagine forward options of Martinelli/Leao/Jesus/Saka…

Wouldn’t mind Locatelli either, Arteta obviously wanted him before he went to Juve as you can’t really question the blokes talent ID anymore. Would be good as could probably cover both Xhaka and #5.
 

RunTheTrap

Nobody laughs on my "jokes" 😫
Lads on about Leao are spot on. We are at the stage where we need level raisers like Jesus/Saliba, not new project players like Mudryk. Imagine forward options of Martinelli/Leao/Jesus/Saka…

Wouldn’t mind Locatelli either, Arteta obviously wanted him before he went to Juve as you can’t really question the blokes talent ID anymore. Would be good as could probably cover both Xhaka and #5.
Locatelli would ideal. But I’m not sure the papers linking him to us are being genuine.
 

Nunowoolmez

Well-Known Member
A lot of rumours about it last year. Seems Arteta admires the player a lot.
Yup. Quality player. Not playing much for Juve but that is not a very good barometer of his level as Juve like to collect as many MF as possible. They are the Chelsea of Serie A - just sign lots of players & waste them.

There is the question mark over whether he would work out, as there arent too many cases of top Italian players coming to the premier league, & even fewer who really do the business.
 

A__G

Cedric and Mari ruined my life
Moderator
Leading the league, with seven wins from eight, and conquerors of north London rivals Tottenham, Arsenal are flying.

With a talented young squad driven by what Aaron Ramsdale has called “a fire inside”, a sense of overwhelming optimism has enveloped the Emirates Stadium.

A cautionary note, then: a glance at the forthcoming fixture list may raise some concerns. Arsenal’s position at the top of the table is well deserved but remains somewhat precarious. Arsenal’s durability is about to be tested.

When Mikel Arteta is able to field his preferred XI, Arsenal’s quality is undeniable. But with a frenetic period of football ahead, supporters will be sweating on the fitness of a number of key individuals. There are certain players they can not afford to lose.

Arsenal’s recent form is founded upon the strength of Arteta’s system. In his early days as Arsenal coach, the game plan would frequently be adapted to counter the opponent’s strengths and exploit their weaknesses. Those adaptations are becoming less and less frequent. Increasingly, Arsenal set out to play their football, their way.

That tactical foundation means certain players can be swapped in and out with relative ease. There is not a huge disparity, for example, between Ben White and Takehiro Tomiyasu in the right-back role. In other areas of the pitch, however, the situation is more delicate — particularly through the spine of the team.

The primary example is Thomas Partey. The Ghanaian produced an outstanding individual performance against Tottenham — one that underlined his importance to the team. The key evolution in Arteta’s side in the past 12 months has been the switch from a double to single pivot at the base of midfield. It has liberated a revitalised Granit Xhaka and allowed Arsenal to release an extra man into attacking areas. Partey is key to this switch — his combination of skill and strength enables him to thrive, even when outnumbered.

The reliance on Partey is reminiscent of Arsenal’s previous dependence on Santi Cazorla. They have come to count on an injury-prone player at the base of their midfield — one whose skillset is not easily replicated. It’s easy enough to say Arsenal should have recruited an alternative to Partey, but where exactly does a team go to buy a backup midfielder who can dribble through the press, pass between the lines and be dominant in physical duels?

Arsenal’s goalkeeper, Ramsdale, is also very important to how the team play. That was clear again against Sp**s when his high starting position and accurate distribution enabled him to outshine Hugo Lloris in the Tottenham goal. While Ramsdale’s shot-stopping abilities have fluctuated somewhat in 2022, his comfort with the ball at his feet makes him highly valuable to Arteta.

This summer, Arsenal replaced Bernd Leno with Matt Turner as Ramsdale’s immediate deputy. It’s still to be established how Turner will fare in the Premier League. What we do know, however, is there is a substantial stylistic difference between the American and Ramsdale. Were the No 1 to be absent, Arsenal would have to acclimatise to a different kind of goalkeeper.

Up top, Gabriel Jesus’ impact has been so transformational that no alternative could hope to adequately replace him. It is no slight against Eddie Nketiah, who has looked bright and threatening when called upon, but Jesus’ quality and mentality have made him invaluable. He defends from the front and provides a much-needed goal threat. Sooner or later, Arsenal will most likely have to do without him — he is already just one booking away from a suspension in the Premier League and his combative style sees him on the end of some increasingly meaty challenges. Jesus has raised Arsenal’s level. It will be fascinating to see to what extent they can maintain their improvement without him.

At centre-half, Arsenal do at least have a reassuring degree of depth. William Saliba’s form has swiftly established him as an integral part of Arteta’s preferred XI, but the presence of Gabriel, White, Tomiyasu and Rob Holding in the squad does offer alternatives. In both full-back positions, too, Arsenal are well-stocked. But in other key areas of the team, the loss of one or two individuals could cost them dear.

The situation is exacerbated by the fact the club are already carrying a couple of significant injuries. Mohamed Elneny and Emile Smith Rowe are both sidelined, with neither expected to feature before the World Cup. Arsenal entered the final week of the summer transfer window hoping to improve their depth in midfield and on the flanks. They weren’t able to do either and have since sustained injuries in precisely those positions.

Arsenal are currently expecting to be in the market during the January transfer window. They will hope to learn lessons from last season’s window, when they failed to strengthen and subsequently lost their grip on a top four place. The club are one of many Premier League teams who anticipate a busy January across the game, with clubs seeking to strengthen squads in the wake of the World Cup. A particularly congested fixture calendar will see many teams, Arsenal included, hoping to add some necessary depth.

Thus far, Arsenal have coped admirably without the absentees. But there is a sense that just one or two more injuries could put a slim squad under strain. It would be an exaggeration to say Arteta is reliant on the same consistent XI, but there is a core of 15 or 16 players who the manager truly seems to trust. Move beyond that and things begin to look less stable.
Arsenal face a daunting schedule of eight fixtures in October, regularly playing twice a week. The physical demands are sure to take their toll on the squad. It feels inevitable that all clubs faced with such a taxing schedule will lose one or two players. The key question when it comes to Arsenal is, “Who?”. Certain players have proven particularly valuable or appear especially difficult to replace.

It’s worth remembering that talk of a title race lies outside of Arsenal’s initial goals for the season. Arsenal do not need to win the league for the season to be deemed a success — a return to the top four would be reward enough to satisfy most.
One thing that may count in their favour is that their Europa League participation does at least grant them the ability to rotate. Rivals competing in the Champions League will not be afforded that luxury, needing to field their strongest teams in both competitions. A fixture list that appears daunting could ultimately work to Arsenal’s favour — if they can avoid injuries.

Arsenal have shown already this season that they are a well-oiled machine. Take out one or two crucial cogs, however, and the Gunners could stutter.
 

OnlyOne

Who Mods the Mods?
Trusted ⭐
Leading the league, with seven wins from eight, and conquerors of north London rivals Tottenham, Arsenal are flying.

With a talented young squad driven by what Aaron Ramsdale has called “a fire inside”, a sense of overwhelming optimism has enveloped the Emirates Stadium.

A cautionary note, then: a glance at the forthcoming fixture list may raise some concerns. Arsenal’s position at the top of the table is well deserved but remains somewhat precarious. Arsenal’s durability is about to be tested.

When Mikel Arteta is able to field his preferred XI, Arsenal’s quality is undeniable. But with a frenetic period of football ahead, supporters will be sweating on the fitness of a number of key individuals. There are certain players they can not afford to lose.

Arsenal’s recent form is founded upon the strength of Arteta’s system. In his early days as Arsenal coach, the game plan would frequently be adapted to counter the opponent’s strengths and exploit their weaknesses. Those adaptations are becoming less and less frequent. Increasingly, Arsenal set out to play their football, their way.

That tactical foundation means certain players can be swapped in and out with relative ease. There is not a huge disparity, for example, between Ben White and Takehiro Tomiyasu in the right-back role. In other areas of the pitch, however, the situation is more delicate — particularly through the spine of the team.

The primary example is Thomas Partey. The Ghanaian produced an outstanding individual performance against Tottenham — one that underlined his importance to the team. The key evolution in Arteta’s side in the past 12 months has been the switch from a double to single pivot at the base of midfield. It has liberated a revitalised Granit Xhaka and allowed Arsenal to release an extra man into attacking areas. Partey is key to this switch — his combination of skill and strength enables him to thrive, even when outnumbered.

The reliance on Partey is reminiscent of Arsenal’s previous dependence on Santi Cazorla. They have come to count on an injury-prone player at the base of their midfield — one whose skillset is not easily replicated. It’s easy enough to say Arsenal should have recruited an alternative to Partey, but where exactly does a team go to buy a backup midfielder who can dribble through the press, pass between the lines and be dominant in physical duels?

Arsenal’s goalkeeper, Ramsdale, is also very important to how the team play. That was clear again against Sp**s when his high starting position and accurate distribution enabled him to outshine Hugo Lloris in the Tottenham goal. While Ramsdale’s shot-stopping abilities have fluctuated somewhat in 2022, his comfort with the ball at his feet makes him highly valuable to Arteta.

This summer, Arsenal replaced Bernd Leno with Matt Turner as Ramsdale’s immediate deputy. It’s still to be established how Turner will fare in the Premier League. What we do know, however, is there is a substantial stylistic difference between the American and Ramsdale. Were the No 1 to be absent, Arsenal would have to acclimatise to a different kind of goalkeeper.

Up top, Gabriel Jesus’ impact has been so transformational that no alternative could hope to adequately replace him. It is no slight against Eddie Nketiah, who has looked bright and threatening when called upon, but Jesus’ quality and mentality have made him invaluable. He defends from the front and provides a much-needed goal threat. Sooner or later, Arsenal will most likely have to do without him — he is already just one booking away from a suspension in the Premier League and his combative style sees him on the end of some increasingly meaty challenges. Jesus has raised Arsenal’s level. It will be fascinating to see to what extent they can maintain their improvement without him.

At centre-half, Arsenal do at least have a reassuring degree of depth. William Saliba’s form has swiftly established him as an integral part of Arteta’s preferred XI, but the presence of Gabriel, White, Tomiyasu and Rob Holding in the squad does offer alternatives. In both full-back positions, too, Arsenal are well-stocked. But in other key areas of the team, the loss of one or two individuals could cost them dear.

The situation is exacerbated by the fact the club are already carrying a couple of significant injuries. Mohamed Elneny and Emile Smith Rowe are both sidelined, with neither expected to feature before the World Cup. Arsenal entered the final week of the summer transfer window hoping to improve their depth in midfield and on the flanks. They weren’t able to do either and have since sustained injuries in precisely those positions.

Arsenal are currently expecting to be in the market during the January transfer window. They will hope to learn lessons from last season’s window, when they failed to strengthen and subsequently lost their grip on a top four place. The club are one of many Premier League teams who anticipate a busy January across the game, with clubs seeking to strengthen squads in the wake of the World Cup. A particularly congested fixture calendar will see many teams, Arsenal included, hoping to add some necessary depth.
Thus far, Arsenal have coped admirably without the absentees. But there is a sense that just one or two more injuries could put a slim squad under strain. It would be an exaggeration to say Arteta is reliant on the same consistent XI, but there is a core of 15 or 16 players who the manager truly seems to trust. Move beyond that and things begin to look less stable.
Arsenal face a daunting schedule of eight fixtures in October, regularly playing twice a week. The physical demands are sure to take their toll on the squad. It feels inevitable that all clubs faced with such a taxing schedule will lose one or two players. The key question when it comes to Arsenal is, “Who?”. Certain players have proven particularly valuable or appear especially difficult to replace.
It’s worth remembering that talk of a title race lies outside of Arsenal’s initial goals for the season. Arsenal do not need to win the league for the season to be deemed a success — a return to the top four would be reward enough to satisfy most.
One thing that may count in their favour is that their Europa League participation does at least grant them the ability to rotate. Rivals competing in the Champions League will not be afforded that luxury, needing to field their strongest teams in both competitions. A fixture list that appears daunting could ultimately work to Arsenal’s favour — if they can avoid injuries.
Arsenal have shown already this season that they are a well-oiled machine. Take out one or two crucial cogs, however, and the Gunners could stutter.

@American_Nacho
 

OnlyOne

Who Mods the Mods?
Trusted ⭐
Leading the league, with seven wins from eight, and conquerors of north London rivals Tottenham, Arsenal are flying.

With a talented young squad driven by what Aaron Ramsdale has called “a fire inside”, a sense of overwhelming optimism has enveloped the Emirates Stadium.

A cautionary note, then: a glance at the forthcoming fixture list may raise some concerns. Arsenal’s position at the top of the table is well deserved but remains somewhat precarious. Arsenal’s durability is about to be tested.

When Mikel Arteta is able to field his preferred XI, Arsenal’s quality is undeniable. But with a frenetic period of football ahead, supporters will be sweating on the fitness of a number of key individuals. There are certain players they can not afford to lose.

Arsenal’s recent form is founded upon the strength of Arteta’s system. In his early days as Arsenal coach, the game plan would frequently be adapted to counter the opponent’s strengths and exploit their weaknesses. Those adaptations are becoming less and less frequent. Increasingly, Arsenal set out to play their football, their way.

That tactical foundation means certain players can be swapped in and out with relative ease. There is not a huge disparity, for example, between Ben White and Takehiro Tomiyasu in the right-back role. In other areas of the pitch, however, the situation is more delicate — particularly through the spine of the team.

The primary example is Thomas Partey. The Ghanaian produced an outstanding individual performance against Tottenham — one that underlined his importance to the team. The key evolution in Arteta’s side in the past 12 months has been the switch from a double to single pivot at the base of midfield. It has liberated a revitalised Granit Xhaka and allowed Arsenal to release an extra man into attacking areas. Partey is key to this switch — his combination of skill and strength enables him to thrive, even when outnumbered.

The reliance on Partey is reminiscent of Arsenal’s previous dependence on Santi Cazorla. They have come to count on an injury-prone player at the base of their midfield — one whose skillset is not easily replicated. It’s easy enough to say Arsenal should have recruited an alternative to Partey, but where exactly does a team go to buy a backup midfielder who can dribble through the press, pass between the lines and be dominant in physical duels?

Arsenal’s goalkeeper, Ramsdale, is also very important to how the team play. That was clear again against Sp**s when his high starting position and accurate distribution enabled him to outshine Hugo Lloris in the Tottenham goal. While Ramsdale’s shot-stopping abilities have fluctuated somewhat in 2022, his comfort with the ball at his feet makes him highly valuable to Arteta.

This summer, Arsenal replaced Bernd Leno with Matt Turner as Ramsdale’s immediate deputy. It’s still to be established how Turner will fare in the Premier League. What we do know, however, is there is a substantial stylistic difference between the American and Ramsdale. Were the No 1 to be absent, Arsenal would have to acclimatise to a different kind of goalkeeper.

Up top, Gabriel Jesus’ impact has been so transformational that no alternative could hope to adequately replace him. It is no slight against Eddie Nketiah, who has looked bright and threatening when called upon, but Jesus’ quality and mentality have made him invaluable. He defends from the front and provides a much-needed goal threat. Sooner or later, Arsenal will most likely have to do without him — he is already just one booking away from a suspension in the Premier League and his combative style sees him on the end of some increasingly meaty challenges. Jesus has raised Arsenal’s level. It will be fascinating to see to what extent they can maintain their improvement without him.

At centre-half, Arsenal do at least have a reassuring degree of depth. William Saliba’s form has swiftly established him as an integral part of Arteta’s preferred XI, but the presence of Gabriel, White, Tomiyasu and Rob Holding in the squad does offer alternatives. In both full-back positions, too, Arsenal are well-stocked. But in other key areas of the team, the loss of one or two individuals could cost them dear.

The situation is exacerbated by the fact the club are already carrying a couple of significant injuries. Mohamed Elneny and Emile Smith Rowe are both sidelined, with neither expected to feature before the World Cup. Arsenal entered the final week of the summer transfer window hoping to improve their depth in midfield and on the flanks. They weren’t able to do either and have since sustained injuries in precisely those positions.

Arsenal are currently expecting to be in the market during the January transfer window. They will hope to learn lessons from last season’s window, when they failed to strengthen and subsequently lost their grip on a top four place. The club are one of many Premier League teams who anticipate a busy January across the game, with clubs seeking to strengthen squads in the wake of the World Cup. A particularly congested fixture calendar will see many teams, Arsenal included, hoping to add some necessary depth.

Thus far, Arsenal have coped admirably without the absentees. But there is a sense that just one or two more injuries could put a slim squad under strain. It would be an exaggeration to say Arteta is reliant on the same consistent XI, but there is a core of 15 or 16 players who the manager truly seems to trust. Move beyond that and things begin to look less stable.
Arsenal face a daunting schedule of eight fixtures in October, regularly playing twice a week. The physical demands are sure to take their toll on the squad. It feels inevitable that all clubs faced with such a taxing schedule will lose one or two players. The key question when it comes to Arsenal is, “Who?”. Certain players have proven particularly valuable or appear especially difficult to replace.

It’s worth remembering that talk of a title race lies outside of Arsenal’s initial goals for the season. Arsenal do not need to win the league for the season to be deemed a success — a return to the top four would be reward enough to satisfy most.
One thing that may count in their favour is that their Europa League participation does at least grant them the ability to rotate. Rivals competing in the Champions League will not be afforded that luxury, needing to field their strongest teams in both competitions. A fixture list that appears daunting could ultimately work to Arsenal’s favour — if they can avoid injuries.

Arsenal have shown already this season that they are a well-oiled machine. Take out one or two crucial cogs, however, and the Gunners could stutter.

Madness people paid for this nonsense btw. ‘Arsenal will look to strengthen in Jan we reckon’ article finished.

Absolute toss.
 

Nacho

World Famous Luchador
Dusted 🔻

Player: Vieira
Madness people paid for this nonsense btw. ‘Arsenal will look to strengthen in Jan we reckon’ article finished.

Absolute toss.

It's like a £1 a month now tbf. Mostly nonsense as you've pointed out.

I stopped reading it (unless there's a big name interview like Raul's, Özil etc).
 

OnlyOne

Who Mods the Mods?
Trusted ⭐
It's like a £1 a month now tbf. Mostly nonsense as you've pointed out.

I stopped reading it (unless there's a big name interview like Raul's, Özil etc).

You need to keep paying otherwise you’ll be out a job on AM.
 

Nacho

World Famous Luchador
Dusted 🔻

Player: Vieira
You need to keep paying otherwise you’ll be out a job on AM.

lol the last article I read was this mystery player in his 40's talking about how he has a screw in his hip and got made to play on injections back in the day like I gave a f*ck. It's actually quite bad.


1664986993891.png


None of this is news.
 

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