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Manager Wish-List Thread

Who would be your candidate to replace Arteta?


  • Total voters
    96

Tir Na Nog

Changes Opinion Every 5 Minutes
44086c8b-3eae-44ce-b13a-60f197e6032d.jpg

Our players were running through bricks walls last week and now they're strolling about, wonder what changed?
 

Sebastes

Statbomb Merchant
Trusted ⭐
Potter seems the obvious one. One thing that's a slight warning sign to me is that he really favors a wingback setup, usually with some variation of 3 cm's and 2 forwards. Tbh I don't know how well that suits our current squad seeing we don't have any clear cut wing backs and Saka, ESR and Martinelli all favors/work best as wingers which his setup doesn't have. It's not adapting tactics to his squad either, he favored the same setup in Sweden with Östersund. There's also the slight red flag on experience. He's not that experienced to be honest and certainly in dealing with so called stars.

Christophe Galtier is one I'd look at. He has plenty of experience and pedigree and is tactically versatile. Knows how to win and isn't reliant on any big fee signings. He took over relegation threatened St Etienne in December 2009 after being assistant coach to the then fired Alain Perrin.
  • Kept them up in the first season
  • Finished top 10 in the consecutive 7 seasons, 4 of which was European places
  • Ended a 32 year long trophy draught, wining the Coupe de la Ligue in 2013
Left St Etienne after the 16/17 season being at that moment the currently longest serving coach in the league and was appointed as manager of 18th placed Lille in December -17.
  • Kept Lille up with a 17th placed finished in the 17/18 season
  • 2nd after PSG in 18/19
  • 4th in 19/20
  • Won the league in 20/21
Two days after winning the league title, he resigned as manager, stating: "I simply have the deep belief that my time is up here.". Signed as manager for Nice, who'd finished 9th in 20/21

Nice is currently 2nd in Ligue 1 (though Marseille have a game in hand).
 

OnlyOne

Who Mods the Mods?
Trusted ⭐
Potter seems the obvious one. One thing that's a slight warning sign to me is that he really favors a wingback setup, usually with some variation of 3 cm's and 2 forwards. Tbh I don't know how well that suits our current squad seeing we don't have any clear cut wing backs and Saka, ESR and Martinelli all favors/work best as wingers which his setup doesn't have. It's not adapting tactics to his squad either, he favored the same setup in Sweden with Östersund. There's also the slight red flag on experience. He's not that experienced to be honest and certainly in dealing with so called stars.

Christophe Galtier is one I'd look at. He has plenty of experience and pedigree and is tactically versatile. Knows how to win and isn't reliant on any big fee signings. He took over relegation threatened St Etienne in December 2009 after being assistant coach to the then fired Alain Perrin.
  • Kept them up in the first season
  • Finished top 10 in the consecutive 7 seasons, 4 of which was European places
  • Ended a 32 year long trophy draught, wining the Coupe de la Ligue in 2013
Left St Etienne after the 16/17 season being at that moment the currently longest serving coach in the league and was appointed as manager of 18th placed Lille in December -17.
  • Kept Lille up with a 17th placed finished in the 17/18 season
  • 2nd after PSG in 18/19
  • 4th in 19/20
  • Won the league in 20/21
Two days after winning the league title, he resigned as manager, stating: "I simply have the deep belief that my time is up here.". Signed as manager for Nice, who'd finished 9th in 20/21

Nice is currently 2nd in Ligue 1 (though Marseille have a game in hand).

Yep, Potter or Galtier for me, only heard about him in the last year but what he’s been doing is incredible.
 

isop

Active Member
Potter seems the obvious one. One thing that's a slight warning sign to me is that he really favors a wingback setup, usually with some variation of 3 cm's and 2 forwards. Tbh I don't know how well that suits our current squad seeing we don't have any clear cut wing backs and Saka, ESR and Martinelli all favors/work best as wingers which his setup doesn't have. It's not adapting tactics to his squad either, he favored the same setup in Sweden with Östersund. There's also the slight red flag on experience. He's not that experienced to be honest and certainly in dealing with so called stars.

Christophe Galtier is one I'd look at. He has plenty of experience and pedigree and is tactically versatile. Knows how to win and isn't reliant on any big fee signings. He took over relegation threatened St Etienne in December 2009 after being assistant coach to the then fired Alain Perrin.
  • Kept them up in the first season
  • Finished top 10 in the consecutive 7 seasons, 4 of which was European places
  • Ended a 32 year long trophy draught, wining the Coupe de la Ligue in 2013
Left St Etienne after the 16/17 season being at that moment the currently longest serving coach in the league and was appointed as manager of 18th placed Lille in December -17.
  • Kept Lille up with a 17th placed finished in the 17/18 season
  • 2nd after PSG in 18/19
  • 4th in 19/20
  • Won the league in 20/21
Two days after winning the league title, he resigned as manager, stating: "I simply have the deep belief that my time is up here.". Signed as manager for Nice, who'd finished 9th in 20/21

Nice is currently 2nd in Ligue 1 (though Marseille have a game in hand).

Christophe Galtier's management of both Lille and Nice from what I've seen has been quite balanced, great in defence, solid and well organised, as well as playing some nice attacking football. Both looked and look so confident, determined with a wining mentality, very well coached and playing at a high level.

Really like Graham Potter too, as well as Lucien Favre and Erik Ten Hag. Rudi Garcia is another notable mention.

Potter seems to switch between 352 and 343, Galtier prefers a 442; those formations don't fit our players, but maybe they could adapt the formation to what suits us.
 

Toby

No longer a Stuttgart Fan
Moderator
There's also the slight red flag on experience. He's not that experienced to be honest and certainly in dealing with so called stars.

Don't want to play the old comparison game here, but to put this experience talk into perspective: Almost any of the top managers out there have started out somewhere rather insignificant and worked their way up, gaining experience on the way - and you can only get experience at a top club if you're actually coaching one.

Klopp did 7 years at Mainz with his big feat being obviously his playing style as well as keeping them up for 3 years plus 2 promotions to Bundesliga - he got hired by Dortmund after getting his second promotion with Mainz, btw. The job of establishing Mainz in the top flight was done by Tuchel the following 5 years.
Potter managed Östersunds for 7 years and got them promoted multiple times while winning a cup, now he's seemingly reinforcing that impressive work doing some very good work at Brighton in the so called toughest league in the world. I don't think experience wise there's a lot between Klopp when he got the Dortmund job and Potter where he is now.
Dortmund and Arsenal are in eerily similar situations even: Ex behemoths in troubled waters. BvB had finished 7, 7, 9, 13 in the four years before Klopp, Arsenal have finished 6, 5, 8, 8 the last four seasons.

Anyway, I don't want to do the Klopp Potter comparison like some do the Klopp or Pep Arteta comparison, I just want to say bar some very, very few exceptions everyone had to start somewhere and everyone now considered a top class coach in the running for or already in a top job had to be given the opportunity at such a top club to prove this. Ten Hag had 5 years as first team manager before Ajax, as laid out Klopp had 7 years before Dortmund, Tuchel 5 years before Dortmund, Conte 5 years before Juve, etc etc. And the time spans for promising young managers to be snapped up by top clubs trying to not just get the most talented players but also the most talented managers on board is getting shorter and shorter. Nagelsmann had 3 years before Leipzig - their status as a top club is definitely up for debate and I surely don't consider them one, but they are usually self professed Bayern challengers - and 5 before Bayern. Marco Rose did Salzburg, Gladbach and ended up at Dortmund in the span of 4 years without being fired by any of those clubs. So I really think Potter's 10 years of nonstop head coaching, especially considering his stints at Östersunds and his current work at Brighton - don't qualify as inexperience.
 

Sebastes

Statbomb Merchant
Trusted ⭐
Don't want to play the old comparison game here, but to put this experience talk into perspective: Almost any of the top managers out there have started out somewhere rather insignificant and worked their way up, gaining experience on the way - and you can only get experience at a top club if you're actually coaching one.

Klopp did 7 years at Mainz with his big feat being obviously his playing style as well as keeping them up for 3 years plus 2 promotions to Bundesliga - he got hired by Dortmund after getting his second promotion with Mainz, btw. The job of establishing Mainz in the top flight was done by Tuchel the following 5 years.
Potter managed Östersunds for 7 years and got them promoted multiple times while winning a cup, now he's seemingly reinforcing that impressive work doing some very good work at Brighton in the so called toughest league in the world. I don't think experience wise there's a lot between Klopp when he got the Dortmund job and Potter where he is now.
Dortmund and Arsenal are in eerily similar situations even: Ex behemoths in troubled waters. BvB had finished 7, 7, 9, 13 in the four years before Klopp, Arsenal have finished 6, 5, 8, 8 the last four seasons.

Anyway, I don't want to do the Klopp Potter comparison like some do the Klopp or Pep Arteta comparison, I just want to say bar some very, very few exceptions everyone had to start somewhere and everyone now considered a top class coach in the running for or already in a top job had to be given the opportunity at such a top club to prove this. Ten Hag had 5 years as first team manager before Ajax, as laid out Klopp had 7 years before Dortmund, Tuchel 5 years before Dortmund, Conte 5 years before Juve, etc etc. And the time spans for promising young managers to be snapped up by top clubs trying to not just get the most talented players but also the most talented managers on board is getting shorter and shorter. Nagelsmann had 3 years before Leipzig - their status as a top club is definitely up for debate and I surely don't consider them one, but they are usually self professed Bayern challengers - and 5 before Bayern. Marco Rose did Salzburg, Gladbach and ended up at Dortmund in the span of 4 years without being fired by any of those clubs. So I really think Potter's 10 years of nonstop head coaching, especially considering his stints at Östersunds and his current work at Brighton - don't qualify as inexperience.
Yeah I agree with that. I just think there's levels to it and managing Östersund through the Swedish league system with pretty much non-existing pressure from the community (don't even know if they can be said to have fans :lol:). So even though he has experience from managing football teams, he doesn't have the experience from the sort of pressure from fans, the club itself or even highly paid players.

As I see it he has his Brighton tenure to count as experience - at least at the top level :)
 

Toby

No longer a Stuttgart Fan
Moderator
Yeah I agree with that. I just think there's levels to it and managing Östersund through the Swedish league system with pretty much non-existing pressure from the community (don't even know if they can be said to have fans :lol:). So even though he has experience from managing football teams, he doesn't have the experience from the sort of pressure from fans, the club itself or even highly paid players.

As I see it he has his Brighton tenure to count as experience - at least at the top level :)

I'll give you the community pressure, but not the highly paid players one as that is something that usually comes with managing financially seriously well off clubs.

And looking at the financial strength of the PL and taking Pascal Groß into account who's rumoured to leave Brighton and return to Germany, he'd have to take a massive paycut to play for 2/3 of all 1. Bundesliga clubs, so I think viewed interntionally at Brighton Potter does have some experience with managing very well paid players :D
 

Sebastes

Statbomb Merchant
Trusted ⭐
Christophe Galtier's management of both Lille and Nice from what I've seen has been quite balanced, great in defence, solid and well organised, as well as playing some nice attacking football. Both looked and look so confident, determined with a wining mentality, very well coached and playing at a high level.

Really like Graham Potter too, as well as Lucien Favre and Erik Ten Hag. Rudi Garcia is another notable mention.

Potter seems to switch between 352 and 343, Galtier prefers a 442; those formations don't fit our players, but maybe they could adapt the formation to what suits us.
Galtier seems to prefer 442, that's true. But iirc he deployed a 433 at Lille as well..?
 

Toby

No longer a Stuttgart Fan
Moderator
Btw @Sebastes I agree with you that Galtier is a very interesting sort of under the radar manager. I'm also impressed by Lopetegui's work who's only big failure up to date was his very short stint at Real. Every other job he's had he's averaged more than 2,00 points per game. Not sure I'd want another Spaniard after Emery & Arteta, though.
 

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