The Effect of Coronavirus on Football

I've already wrote enought about this topic, I won't repeat myself. You're looking at the problem from a different angle than it should be looked at in my opinion. We've already established that the transmission and severity are effected with vaccination. But severity isn't a problem in most demographics and consequently the transmission shouldn't be the focus of the problem. Focus on those who are the most endengared. Look at the data of hospitalizations, severe cases and deaths. You'll get a clear picture who needs protection.

There are multiple problems with this approach in my opinion

-more unvaccinated people means greater risk of mutation and more difficult to control strains emerging

-the effects of long covid adding more cost to the healthcare system. People developing conditions post covid. These people will need to be treated the rest of their lives

-what about health care workers and others that work with high risk populations? Shouldn't they be mandated to be vaccinated to protect those under the care?
 
The lenght people are trying to go to prove their point. Do you honestly believe lockdowns have a positive effect(s) on the society? :lol: Look around and open your eyes ffs.

Healthcare system being overwhelmed are also down to decades and decades of either underfunding of the system by the governments or wild privatisation of the healthcare sector.

Look mate I live in NZ and I can tell you we've had none of the problems youre talking about. The problem is doing half arsed knockdowns weeks too late. If you have a competent government that can decisively go into lock down without delay you get good results. Everyone I know agrees that we were better off with strict lock down in March 2020. This allowed us to eliminate covid within a few months and go back to normal.

I don't understand the point you're trying to make with regards to the healthcare system. Yes underfunding and privatisation erodes a healthcare system. Adding an uncontrolled covid outbreak would make it even worse. Using NZ again as an example, if there was a uncontrolled covid outbreak last year it would've been apocalyptic. The healthcare system can barely keep up with localised outbreaks of RSV. Covid would've been a disaster. Lockdown saved the entire healthcare sector.
 

Makingtrax

Planes, Trains & Social Media Rants
There are multiple problems with this approach in my opinion

-more unvaccinated people means greater risk of mutation and more difficult to control strains emerging

-the effects of long covid adding more cost to the healthcare system. People developing conditions post covid. These people will need to be treated the rest of their lives

-what about health care workers and others that work with high risk populations? Shouldn't they be mandated to be vaccinated to protect those under the care?
Antivaxxers don’t base any of their arguments on common sense, there’s the problem. Their approach originates in conspiracy theories, or is founded on a completely heartless herd immunity that would have ravaged the population and ruined the health service.
 
Antivaxxers don’t base any of their arguments on common sense, there’s the problem. Their approach originates in conspiracy theories, or is founded on a completely heartless herd immunity that would have ravaged the population and ruined the health service.

He seems to constantly claim his position is based on facts and data yet I've seen him only post 1 research article, and the authors of that article state that mass vaccination should be encouraged :lol:
 

Makingtrax

Planes, Trains & Social Media Rants
The fight against Covid and it’s variants and the rapid development of safe and effective vaccines is probably one of the greatest scientific achievements in recent years.

The battle against the other virus – a social media-fuelled storm of misinformation from anti vaxxers - seems to be a much bigger struggle.
 

hydrofluoric acid

Many Men Wish Death Upon Me
UK approach is good. I predict they will stand strong against covid by the second quarter next year.

The approach is justified with over 97% vaccinated barely getting sick of covid. Letting the most active groups in the society get covid should be good, it strengthens memory b cells response further than just vaccination..
 

GeorgiaGunner

#FreeClaude
Amazed at people laughing at this post. You’ll be the one with the last laugh though.

I’m hoping to get my 3rd jab fairly soon and would go for Moderna to go with my two Pfizer’s given a chance. And also getting this years flu jab too.
FWIW, I think we're currently overreacting to COVID (due to media pushing stories + gov'ts grabbing power).

But even so, though both small quantums, I'm far less afraid of a vax than of COVID. Anyone who lines up the various potential negative effects of each (and the percentage chances thereof), then picks the latter, is just screaming "I can't do math."
 

ExtjExhtts

=Ex timo jens Ex Highbury two thousand six
Vaccination is mankind's greatest medical achievement. Growing up in the pre-vax days used to be a veritable (viral and bacterial) minefield.

I was very afraid before i took my shots. I was one of the people that had to take two different vaccines so that made my fear worse. So yes, i can understand vaccine fear. But in the end i took my shots and this kind of fear has nothing to do with the deranged antivaxxers.
 

GeorgiaGunner

#FreeClaude

bergholt

Well-Known Member
Stop with this nonsense. You're either completely brainwashed or don't know what you're talking about. It's an established (proven by numbers) fact it comes down to your immune system.

Cancer can ruing anybody, any age, so can plethora of other diseases. If we're going by your logic we should all be scared ****less of any disease because it's all down to luck if we get it or not.

Yeah that's the way health works basically.

I've got a very very healthy friend, super athletic, has done marathons, eats well etc. He's just been diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease. He's ****ed.

Don't think that was anything to do with his immune system.
 

TornadoTed

Well-Known Member
I'm a big believer in vaccines. My Father contracted polio in 1948 and I watched him hobble around on sticks all his life, I also grew up visiting some of his friends who were less fortunate. Ten years later polio was pretty much eradicated in the UK. My grandfather died of TB in 1940, again just over 10 years later it had gone from wide spread to pretty much eradicated in the UK. Vaccines have saved countless suffering over the ensuing decades so I had no apprehension about getting the vaccines at all.
 

RacingPhoton

❤️ Xhaka ❤️
The vaccines have proven effective already. UK lockdowns were lifted few months ago. We are back to attending big sport events, parties with more people and still the death rate per day is around 100. Earlier this year, we had death rates above 1000 per day in spite of having stricter rules around gathering. It has been a huge win for us.
Would we have achieved the same thing by only vaccinating the people at risk? Would the number of hospital admissions be as less if we had only vaccinated the risky age group? One can only speculate. As things stand, the vaccines have been quite successful.
 

Beksl

Sell All The Youngsters
Wild unbased arguments about vaccines get posted, yet when challenged the usual reply is: The facts are out there, go and check them out yourself.

Straight from the conspiracy tinfoil club playbooks.

No one here was posting wild and unbased arguments thou. If you can't see that vaccine mandates are not only about public healthcare spoon feeding you information won't help.
 

Beksl

Sell All The Youngsters
Yeah that's the way health works basically.

I've got a very very healthy friend, super athletic, has done marathons, eats well etc. He's just been diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease. He's ****ed.

Don't think that was anything to do with his immune system.

Sorry to hear that. MND is a very rare neurodegenerative disorder indeed. What specifically was he diagnosed with? ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), PMA (progressive muscular atrophy), PLS (primary lateral sclerosis are the most ''common'' ones.
 

bergholt

Well-Known Member
Sorry to hear that. MND is a very rare neurodegenerative disorder indeed. What specifically was he diagnosed with? ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), PMA (progressive muscular atrophy), PLS (primary lateral sclerosis are the most ''common'' ones.

Yeah no idea tbh, very early days of the diagnosis and he's not my closest mate so I'm not pushing for more info yet.
 

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